The Camera Package

The filming/photography that I do is possibly the best part of my travel experience… yes I love the experiences themselves, but I’m such a nostalgic person that looking back on the things I did and the people I met is where I find a much of my appreciation for how lucky I am.  Sure I still love to live in the moment and there’s countless times that I think the world is going to implode because it’s so ridiculously beautiful and wonderful that my heart can’t really take it, but that doesn’t mean I’m not going to try and steal that moment so I can have it forever.

camera package

2 batteries + charger, 2 lens hoods, the Canon 6D, Canon lenses: 70-300mm, 50mm, 24-105mm & Sigma 70 mm 1:2.8 DG Macro

I love and hate my camera package because it brings me so much joy to shoot and create while I’m on the move, but it is giving me serious back and posture issues because it is quite heavy.  The camera itself is 1.5 pounds and with a lens attached closer to 4.  Maybe it doesn’t sound like much, but in the life of someone who is lugging all their stuff on their back that’s around 10 pounds of just camera equipment.  Add my laptop and I think it makes up half the way I’m carrying!

Right now I’m working on a Canon 6D, which I bought in around December of 2013 for around $1400 for just the camera body.   Along with the camera I have 4 lenses that I use intermittently… some more than others.  There’s three Canon lenses I carry, a 50mm F1.4, L series 24-105mm  F4-5.6, 70-300mm F4-5 as well as a Sigma 70mm dedicated macro.

The 24-105mm gets the most usage because it is the most flexible with the most useful zoom range.  It’s just necessary for catching landscapes and I have to say many times I wish I could go wider than 24mm.

sunrise over mount roraima And the 105mm is definitely a decent zoom.  Especially for filming I find this lens essential as I’m shooting on the fly, rather than planning and setting up shots where I could have time to change lenses.

Kuna indian woman sewing, San Blas handicrafts

I love the 50mm the most because the images are always super sharp, though I mostly use it for low light situations since it’s the fastest lens I have, opening up to 1.4.  It was actually pretty dark here, just after the sun had set, and you can see how well it still captures an image still (ISO200, 1/100sec f7.1):

cat living on a boat, cute cats, sailing adventures

I’m not terribly fond of the 70-300mm and I admit I mostly bought it to spy on people because it zooms in pretty close, but it did get me some great footage I’d never have been able to get on the Amazon boat ride.  These houses were actually quite distant from the boat.

stilt houses along amazon river, brazil indigenous communities

I use the macro lens the least because it’s just least useful for what I’m taking photos of.  Ironically, as it is probably the heaviest.  It’s a dedicated macro, so basically only for close, close shots, but I do love seeing it in action whenever I get the chance or if I happen to have it on me when there’s insects around — which has been rare even if I’m in Brazil.  There’s been some good captures though:

chapada diamantina, spider, fauna, brazil, macro photography, Sigma 105mm

After shooting, I generally run my photos through a light post-processing via Adobe Lightroom on my 2013 retina display MacBook Pro.  Since the computer isn’t really happy about handling a heavy editing program like Avid Media Composer, I’ve switched to Adobe Premiere 6 for my video editing purposes.  It’s the last bit I need to pull up some of the darks to create images like this:

milkyway, stars, camping, roraima

Here’s our tent underneath the milkyway and billions of stars.

From the unprocessed image:

Here is the unprocessed image.  I had to bring up the darks slightly to see the night sky because when I exposed the shot I didn't want to overexpose the tent light.  For digital, overexposure causes you to lose information (like the really bright sun just turns into a blotch of white), but underexposing slightly still registers the info, allowing you do edit an image.

Here is the unprocessed image. I had to bring up the darks slightly to see the night sky because when I exposed the shot I didn’t want to overexpose the tent light. For digital, overexposure causes you to lose information (like the really bright sun just turns into a blotch of white), but underexposing slightly still registers the info, allowing you do edit an image. When it’s just stars, you can just do the long exposure and go after the stars.

So now you know some of my secrets.  Let me know if you like these type of photo posts or if you see an image you have a question about I will maybe let you know the story behind it:)

This post is for my cousin who recently asked what I was using to shoot my photos… thanks for reading Jake:)

 

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